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Survey to Assess Needs for Improved Course Designs

Survey to Assess Needs for Improved Course Designs

As colleges and universities offer more courses online, it is important that we consider how students with autism spectrum disorders approach online communities, especially online classes. My experiences as a diagnosed high-functioning autistic student and instructor have led me to question how online courses could be designed to better serve students with autism spectrum disorders. I am conducting a survey, seeking to determine if there are characteristics of some online communities ASD individuals prefer. I am also interested in learning what qualities of online communities might be disliked by individuals with ASDs.

If you are an individual with an officially diagnosed autism spectrum disorder interested in offering opinions about online communities, I hope you will consider completing this brief online survey. You do not have to be a student. However, you should have some experiences with online communities so you can explain what design qualities are or are not appealing in various communities.

This will be an anonymous survey. Only your answers to interview questions will be saved and referenced during the study.

If you are interested in participating in these interviews, please visit the following survey link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=6hUN2HISyDpNYnlwPpLkxQ_3d_3d

Thank you,

C. S. Wyatt
Doctoral Candidate
Rhetoric; Scientific and Technical Communication
Digital Literacy and Pedagogy
Dept. of Writing Studies
University of Minnesota
wyatt050@umn.edu

This study is referenced by University of Minnesota IRB Code Number 0909P72516.

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